The University of Delaware recently conducted a study that shows a promising link between the prevention of memory loss and boosting cognitive ability with the consumption of tart cherry juice.

Boosting cognitive performance and prevention of memory loss should not just be the goal of older adults. And neither should it be a goal solely to gain more money or traction up the corporate ladder. Even people in the prime of their lives should opt to promote and protect their brain health. Why? Cases of dementia are on the rise. It is an umbrella term used to refer to a decline in thinking, problem-solving, language, and memory skills that affect a person’s ability to perform daily chores.

The Study on Tart Cherry Juice

In a different study, the University of Delaware stumbled upon the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of the tart Montmorency cherries. It was shown to be capable of reducing blood pressure. The researchers wanted to explore the cherries’ properties further and tested their efficacy on brain health.

The new study results showed that frequent consumption of tart cherry juice showed to improve cognitive abilities as demonstrated by their decision making and memory skills. This is in comparison to test subjects who did not consume any tart cherry juice at all. It was proposed that the cherries’ oxidative stress-fighting and anti-inflammatory properties may help boost the blood flow to the brain, thereby increasing mental capacity. It is also believed that the bioactive compounds it contains like melanin, anthocyanins, and polyphenols may be crucial to its blood-pressure-lowering effects.

Importance of Cognitive Function

It is crucial to reiterate that cognitive function is a vital indicator of the quality of life and independence—whether as an older adult or not. That’s why it is important to start providing your brain function with the support and protection it needs to continue to do its cognitive role efficiently and reliably. And one way of achieving this is through the frequent consumption of tart cherries in the form of juice as put forth by the study.

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